You asked: When should I worry about my child’s leg pain?

Parents should be concerned if your child’s pain does not subside with gentle rubbing, a heating pad, and some ibuprofen, or if your child refuses to let you touch her. An injury such as a growth plate fracture or ankle sprain is painful to touch, and the pain would be felt continually, not just at night.

When should I take my child to the doctor for leg pain?

If your child’s pains are persistent and still present in the morning or early day, or if they’re accompanied by swelling, fever or weakness, it may be time to visit an orthopedic doctor. If your child’s pains are associated with an injury, you should take them to see a doctor.

How do I know if my leg pain is serious?

Seek immediate medical attention if you observe these symptoms:

  1. Fever and other signs of infection.
  2. Bluish or blackish colored leg.
  3. Cold and pale legs.
  4. Swelling of legs with breathing difficulties.
  5. Unable to put more weight on the leg.
  6. Leg injury with popping and grinding noise.
  7. Swollen, red painful legs.
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Are growing pains in one leg?

Growing pains are often described as an ache or throb in the legs — often in the front of the thighs, the calves or behind the knees. Growing pains tend to affect both legs and occur at night, and may even wake a child from sleep. Although these pains are called growing pains, there’s no evidence that growth hurts.

What can growing pains be mistaken for?

Toxic synovitis is a common cause of hip pain in children that can often be mistaken for growing pains or a pulled muscle. Toxic synovitis is a temporary condition that occurs due to inflammation of the inner lining of the hip joint. This inflammation may cause pain or stiffness in some children.

What does leg pain indicate?

Most leg pain results from wear and tear, overuse, or injuries in joints or bones or in muscles, ligaments, tendons or other soft tissues. Some types of leg pain can be traced to problems in your lower spine. Leg pain can also be caused by blood clots, varicose veins or poor circulation.

How long do growing pains last in legs?

How long do growing pains last? During a bout, growing pains last from minutes to hours, but most often it’s between ten and 30 minutes. Growing pains usually get better on their own in a year or two. If they persist longer, they often become less painful.

What is vascular leg pain like?

Vascular pain is pain that is caused as a result of interruption of blood flow to a tissue or muscles. If you are experiencing lack of circulation, pain, or heaviness in certain areas, you might be having vascular pain. There also may be numbness, weakness, or a tingling feeling in the affected area.

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Can dehydration cause leg pain?

Dehydration

Dehydration is one of the most common causes of leg cramps. A cramp is an involuntary contraction of a muscle. The fluids in your body allow your muscles to relax, but—when those muscles are dehydrated—they get irritable and prone to cramping.

What helps growing pains in legs?

Lifestyle and home remedies

  1. Rub your child’s legs. Children often respond to gentle massage. …
  2. Use a heating pad. Heat can help soothe sore muscles. …
  3. Try a pain reliever. Offer your child ibuprofen (Advil, Children’s Motrin, others) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). …
  4. Stretching exercises.

Why do children’s legs hurt at night?

Growing pains are cramping, achy muscle pains that some preschoolers and preteens feel in both legs. The pain usually occurs in the late afternoon or evenings. But it may cause your child to wake up in the middle of the night. Growing pains usually start in early childhood, around age 3 or 4.

Is leg pain a symptom of leukemia?

Bone pain can occur in leukemia patients when the bone marrow expands from the accumulation of abnormal white blood cells and may manifest as a sharp pain or a dull pain, depending on the location. The long bones of the legs and arms are the most common location to experience this pain.

How can you tell the difference between serious and growing pains?

Pain that might be something more serious includes pain in the joints (elbows, knees, shoulders, etc.) and swollen, red, tender or warm joints. Growing pains are usually bilateral; your child would feel pain on both sides of the body, maybe one leg today, the other leg tomorrow, or both are painful today.

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How do you know if its growing pains or something else?

These symptoms can mean it’s something more serious than growing pains:

  1. Your child hurts for a long time, throughout the day.
  2. The pain is there in the morning.
  3. They still hurts long after getting an injury.
  4. Their joints ache.
  5. They have a fever.
  6. They get unusual rashes.
  7. They limp or favor one leg.
  8. They are tired or weak.